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and hiring education. a special welcome to all the penn staters here along with those of you covering a educational issues. we need your continued engagement. thank you for joining us and bringing along the penn state cookies. according to google news there are 45,000 stories about penn state and jerry sandusky. you have written them, you have read them and i imagine most of you have formed an opinion about and state in our actions over the last year. but beyond the headlines there's another reality, one that exists for penn state's 96,000 students, 44,000 full and part-time faculty and staff and over 550,000 living alumni. it is a world of teaching research and service. a world with an $800 million research program, hundreds of degrees offered, 24 campuses, online world campus, academic health center, law school, 157 years of tradition. it is also in world that has continued to face ongoing controversy surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidenced by the attorney general's further charge
is recognize that we need to cut, cut, cut. and reenvig rate what our priorities are. the example is education verses the bullet train, i don't think that we can have both right now. >> thank you. >> mr. leno? >> yes. what i have learned through ten years of working in the state legislature, is we have a very serious and significant governor nans problem and that is two-thirds vote requirement on the most important issue of the day which is revenue. we have seen our revenue cut significantly by taxes that arnold schwarzenegger cut his first day in office. we have a depoll that prop is trying to refill it. we should not have to do it at the ballot box when out of 40 state senators 14 have more power than 26. 14 can veto when 26 want. i tell fifth graders that and they say that is not democracy that is not possible. that is exactly the problem, we don't have democracy on all issues, revenue-related in the legislature, let the majority party do its job and if the voters don't like what the majority party is doing in no one jerry man dered districts change who is in power, it is call democracy. >>
of the economic downturn, the education in our country has had to squeeze from every angle, city budgets for education have dropped, state budgets have dropped, so it makes it challenging most experts would say to believe our students in the future will be competing on a level playing field with other students around the world because the bigger class size is now and less time with quality teachers. how would you improve education first of all and in fact mr. smith you suggested eliminating the department of education altogether. is that the right plan at this moment? casey: the best place is that the state level. that is where between the local school boards, teachers and parents. now i don't -- i said i wanted to take a look at the department of education, and it's possible. but they do some good things so we don't want to throw that away. but we need -- any federal organizations basically as big as the department of education there is a lot waste. just to get that money to the states. they can do it themselves and that is a state issue but it would be more economical doing that. and w
's. rather than just putting one person on education to try to gobble that entire fire hose that comes at them, they can add narratives and subtract them, make sure people are involved. if they are not enrolled in those narratives, something will play out without their impact. >> a follow-up question -- i am not thinking of any city in particular here. with that kind of operation, let's say you have that operation in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange things. i imagine that. it was owned by somebody who was very openly talking they were going to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. i imagine something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you, to do more to fill that void? or can you still fill the void -- is that city just out of luck? >> first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism. locally, the owners of the "union tribune" just purchased the "north county times" -- the assets are collapsing in value. they bought it for $12 million, sold h
the distractions, and listen and learn and read and question more about who is really benefiting and educating ourselves on how we got here and figure out how each of us can make a positive impact, that's the way to change the system. knowledge sharing, truth-seeking, open debate, fresh ideas, and discovering a common ground among each other. no matter what your political persuasion, we are the critical time in our nation's history. it's time to take our country back from the private interests who control our beliefs, our opinions and our lives. [cheers and applause] thank you very much for joining us tonight. our moderator this evening is award-winning broadcaster and media personality larry king. [cheers and applause] >> don't, don't. >> his new online home is aura tv and he is the host of "larry king now." welcome larry. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. and welcome everybody. i'm very happy to be doing this. i think all voices should be heard. a few notes about the format for tonight's debate, really easy job for me because it's a rather simple format. each candidate will have an opportu
levees. i kept thinking, the category 5 levees we need are shelter and quality education and health care for everybody and infrastructure and transportation so that people can move on. is there any possibility of taking that and making it a broader conversation, environmental policy or housing policy that makes it easier to manage this? >> i think there is. i agree with neera that people like this post-partisan moment. they are tired of partisan politics and nothing getting done. we need it all. we need education and infrastructure. bloomberg endorsed obama citing global warming as the cause. twice in the last 14 months, new york city has had to evacuate. that has never happened before in the city's history. all these things are in play. this has changed the dynamic. there is a sense we need to move on this. i wish we could have bipartisan agreement on how to move forward. >> it is tough to have bipartisan agreement when republicans keep being climate change designers and anti-science in a variety of ways. >> anti-science, we are still dealing with 46 million people on food stamps. we ar
has got better jobs plan, and better record, and a better budget plan, a better education plan, at a better health care plan than governor romney. if you listen to all the debates, the republican arguments come down to the. -- to this. we left him a terrible mess and in 4 years he did not fix it. we have finally discovered that middle-class people are having a hard time. put us back again. we will do the same thing we did before. that is basically the argument. look at this. i hope i have earned some credibility with you. [cheers and applause] on jobs and budgets. do you believe our country works better when we are all together or when your on your own? do you believe our economy works better when we share prosperity in response ability or whether we just keep the money at the top and help it trickles down? -- hope it trickles down? do you believe our policies are better when we make them based on evidence or extremist ideology? do you believe our budget are better women for them based on an arithmetic or illusion? barack obama as a senator ran for president for nearly two year
challenges of the week. i'm honored to be here, your appreciation for the penn state and higher education. we need your continued engagement. again, thank you for joining us. thank you for bringing along the penn state cookies. [laughter] according to google news, there's over 45,000 stories about penn state and sandusky. you've written them. you've read them. i imagine that most of you have formed an opinion about penn state and our actions over the last year. beyond the headlines, there's another reality, one that exists for penn state's 96,000 students, 44,000 full and part-time faculty and staff, and over 550,000 living alumni. it's a world of teaching, research, and service. it's a world with an $800 million research program, hundreds of degrees offered, 24 campuses, online world campus, academic health center, a law school, and 157 years of tradition. it's also a world that has continued to face ongoing controversies surrounding jerry sandusky, our board of trustees, current and former administrators, and me. the legal process continues to unfold as evidence by the attorney generals fur
have lots of water. there is any number of issues, whether it is around energy or education. this strikes me as a way to get around the challenge of government is dysfunctional and compartmentalize. you have a lot here. it seems like this might be part of the solution. >> before i comment about that, i want to be sure that we do not forget those have been unemployed so long they are out of the workforce. real question will skill readiness. i do not want to forget them in the equation. it is music my ears to hear the definition of the problem and information. it is music to my ears to hear that. we have a piecemeal approach of a couple of initiatives. they're really attract well to analyze and a city that is depopulating. you're trying to talk about redefining wealth. i think of the outbidding the police cars with the cameras, everybody has done that i think. both of those were seeded with grant money. when the grant ran out, we have not been able to keep up. there needs to be that money, whether it be federal or state. there needs to be this institutional approach that redef
. third was this body mass of education. the education is good in some pockets of the region and that in some. how can we use smarter principles, raced to the top, whatever. but it's really focused on what are the problems. let's take our breath and move on to the others. >> so that they take care and also folks have questions. the microphones are here. what i take from this conversation i want to get your response on the advice is to think about the city is a network of players, some very large, like a henry ford medical come even some of the cultural institutions, some of the employers, et cetera. a network of players who can take their own responsibility, obviously in partnership with the government around certain sets of issues. and the michael's point about what is the right issue to tackle because in the southeast, there's no water. last time i checked, you got lots of water, the great lakes. not your problem. but there's obviously a number of issues, whether it's run energy, education, health. this strikes me as a way to get around the challenge of government is dysfun
sectors of the economy -- education, health care, energy -- that haven't really been disrupted that much in the last 25 years, what i think of as the first internet revolution, getting everybody to believe it was important, get connected, multiple devices, multiple networks, that's sort of been accomplished. the second revolution is how you use the mobility of the internet to transform other aspects of life. those are worthy, you know, great entrepreneurs across the country are supporting, and they are the industries that are going to drive, you know, the future. initially, it was sort of the agriculture revolution, kind of, you know, the midwest and then sort of the industrial revolution and then sort of the finance and media revolution, more recently the technology revolution, the next wave is where we need to be positioned as a nation, and we really need to recognize these entrepreneurs are in some ways american heroes, too, because they're the ones who are taking the risk of starting these companies that can change the world, but also make sure we have a robust, growing economy in wh
legitimate and getting an education and making sure that your relationships, people were legitimately married. anything that pointed back words or made you illegitimate was not really something they wanted to talk about and have out there. it is too bad because it closed a lot of doors in our family and that is what you found in michele obama's family. very fortunate, you were able to help and truly open those doors for her family. >> at least with been -- within her family, there are those conversations happening. as i said americans, ordinary americans across the country are making these discoveries with dna testing so these conversations are happening around the country. when you talk about marriage and the importance of legitimacy, one of the other stories which talks about the variations of the american experience during slavery was the first lady's family had ancestors who were freed for decades before the civil war and one of the most interesting records i came across was a record which showed those members of her family who after the civil war went to the courthouse and lined up to ge
, and herman cain with the mission to educate the public on issues facing us today. john: that government doesn't always make life better? >> that government has to get out of the way, or this economy and this country's going down the tubes. john: the chicken ad, you know, people say it's ridiculous, this is low budget. it's silly. it's beneath the importance of politics, and, yet, on super tuesday -- >> one of the most viewed youtube videos out there, just like the smoking ad. john: got more hitshan all the other guys running their commercials. >> combined, yes. john: the girl who says "any questions" is the director's daughter. >> yes. john: this director works for other people in addition to the smoking man ad. one is a c congressial candidate running in california against nancy pelosi -- good luck to him -- immediate -- med ya was not giving him attention. >> strangling job creation, burying us under a mountain of debt. >> do you want 500 americans to lose their jobs? are you serious? >> i am. john dennis, and i approve this message. john: he's the candidate, but, really, zombies. argue the
-centric for something in the future. to me, both of those reasons focus on this time of investing in education and development of future capabilities, tactics, techniques, and procedures. we have to invest in that going forward. >> could i do a short follow-up? what does that approach imply for the army civilians and contractors? do they become diminished? >> they might in terms of numbers, but it will still play a role. >> and how do you incorporate the planning of what those numbers need to be, particularly on the contractor side? >> you want to have the right balance. again, contractors provide us with its unique capabilities that we simply do not have. that is what they will focus on. we have department of army civilians that will provide continuity and consistency that we need. then you need our military members in order to provide us with experience, expertise, and frankly sometimes, just the validity of what we are trying to do based on their experiences. that is where and try to capture the right mix. right now, it is overbalanced toward contractors and civilians. i'm trying to rebalan
, the words of comprehensive immigration reform, the focus on innovative economy, reform of education the like, it's fine. it's the lack of application of those words the inability to square up the reforms with the h 1 b visas. >> one simple bill would boost entrepreneurship all over is. if any foreigner wants to come and start an american company. i'm talking about them bringing in their own money 20 hens and hundreds of thousands of dollars from their friends their families from back home. if after five years they employeeemployfive workers we'll give you a green card. >> gavin: why that has not provided a champion from the president himself. >> there have been several bills attempted to be passed, but they're just stalled in economies and they don't go anywhere. if the president wanted to repay silicon valley for giving him all the political donations and supporting him he basically would have told his supporters to get this bill passed. he hasn't done that. it's that simple. >> gavin: what is the argument against it? you said it doesn't take away from american jobs. is that the concern? th
to educators if something like this comes to their attention. >> some jurors told the judge they taught the defendant had the best of intentions but there was, quote, significant disagreement about whether she took the appropriate action. >> thank you. tonight the woman whose video helped convict ross mirkarimi of domestic violence is ending her long silence. she released a political ad today targeting san francisco supervisor christina alahi. her!&ixg reelection bid, now, te alahi cast one of the votes that kept mirkarimi in office. >> voters need to know what alahi did. i live in district five next door to a convicted batterer who is our sheriff because she thinks it's okay to abuse your wife and run a major law enforcement agency. i'm running for anyone on the ballot but christina alahi. >> the campaign issued a statement saying politicizing thisyid issue is silencing nlrvisors in a way that is dangerous. sheriff mirkarimi says the ads in his words reflects politics of retribution. >> county sheriffs are worried they may not have enough money to run jails. the problem is that state h
. it is the highest income region. it has people with the highest educational level and the state on average. it tends to be the most democratic region. if you go down to tidewater and hampton roads, that is a heavy defense industry area. it is a white-collar and blue- collar and has a large african- american population. it also has a relatively low nativity rape, people there were not necessarily born in virginia. the navy brings in many people from across the nation and the world. the richmond area as an urban area but it is probably the most conservative urban region in this area. it might be one of the most conservative and the country. it is a traditional area particularly because the west side of richmond -- the east side is heavily african-american and the west side is predominantly white and conservative and has a high negativity rate. some of the counties have become more diverse but by and large, it is also a conservative area. you can include far southwest virginia as a world unto itself. it used to beat republican but mountain valley republican, more liberal republican and now -- and then
organizational effectiveness and improved doctrine, education, training and exercises. the directive comes with an already increased attention on dsca which we have seen the development of courses and training now delivered at multiple professional military education programs and other venues and the maturing of thinking and policies since 9/11 and katrina. there is a recognition within this analysis that there are gaps in awareness of the capabilities dod can provide in complex catastrophes, as well as the inherent complexities and lack of understanding in our various chains of command and our authorities. the report recognizes what we have used to drive the dsca portion of fleet week, that local authorities are likely to be overwhelmed in a complex catastrophe and that the president will direct support to civil authorities. that san francisco fleet week assumption is now stated as a guiding principle inside the dod for planning and activities. the objective of the dod effort is to enable the effective access to and use of defense capabilities in the event of a disaster. critical to thi
. nobody else can do this to the extent we can. we have very sharp people, well-educated, well schooled and trained particularly in the medical profession's to make a difference on things. and we have this ongoing research and development as background to make us all better at doing these things. so, these are the basics, and one of the things we would like to draw out today is what else is there that we should understand, what else can we do, how can we take these attributes and capabilities and maybe make them better? i won't want to monopolize all the time, but i would like to throw my desire on the table, and that is it's been a great honor, and i have to admit an eye opener at first to go around the world to places that are certainly less privileged than we are and to see the dedicated efforts of so many people not just from this country but many other countries who are trying to make a difference in places that need help with is a medical area or general health and welfare of people advancing their education, let in this venue the fundamental security, personal security through be
to not necessarily covering beats but covering narrative's. rather than just putting one person on education to try to double that entire fire house that comes at him, -- fire hose that comes at them, they can add narratives and subtract them, make sure people are involved. if they are not enrolled in those neighbor -- narratives, something will play out without their impact. >> a follow-up question -- i am not thinking of any city in particular here. with that kind of operation, let's say you have that operation in a city where the daily newspaper in town started to do some very strange things. i imagine that. it was owned by somebody who was very openly talking they were going to support particular causes, particular developments, particular parties. i imagine something like that could happen. does that add to the obligation of citizens, people like you, to do more to fill that void? or can you still -- fill the void -- is that city just out of luck? >> first of all, it is a remarkable symbol of what is happening to journalism. locally, the owners of the "union tribune" just purchased the "north
't afford four more years like the last four years. this election is about big things, like the education of our children, the value of our homes, the take home pay from our jobs, the price for the gasoline we buy and the choices we have in our healthcare. it's about the big things that determine those things, like the growth of the economy, the strength of our military, our dependence on foreign oil and america's leadership in the world. president obama frequently reminds us that he inherited a trouble led economy, but a troubled economy is not that all he inherited. he also inherited the greatest nation in the history of the earth. [applause] he inherited the most productive and innovative nation in history. he inherited the largest economy in the world. and he inherited a people that have always risen to the occasion regardless of the challenges they face so long as they've been led by men and women who guided the nation with vision and conviction. despite all that he inherited president obama did not repair our economy, he did not save medicare and social security t. he did not tame t
, better education plan, than his opponent, gov. romney. if you listen to all those debates -- the republican argument comes down to, we left him a terrible mess, and in four years he didn't fix it. we discovered middle class people are having a hard time. so take him out and put ius back in and we'll do what we did before on steriods. that is the argument. let's loo ak at this. i hope i've earned some credibility with you. on jobs and budgets. first thing we have to decide is, do you believe the country works better when we're all in this together or when you're on your own. do you believe the economy works better with shared responsibility or we give all the money to the top and hope it trickles down? or that our policies are better based on evidence or extremeist idiology. onwhe nwe base them oour budges illusion?tic or first of all, let's start with the facts. obama ran for president for two years, including the secretary of state and joe biden. they all thought what they were doing was offering specific solutions. to change the courst of a weak economy. before the meltd
, google, and apple, and other countries to educate myself on what the trends in this industry are because information technology world is going to be driving our entire economy in ways we can't understand now. ewe can tell from doug's niche titch what they look at is going to be significant for all industry. privacy is one part of it, but given the active nature of the current administration, that's just a perfectly ripe area for a tremendous amount of litigation and regulation to break out. i want to make sure i understand it, and i hope you guys will take general up on his invitation to participate in that effort because initiatives coming from the national ag's association can be very, very significant as you all know. >> well, as you all can see, no longer just the down ballot state office holder slot. these ag's are making an impact across the country on a number of issues, and i hope you will stay focused on what they are doing and provide them your input. thank you so much. give them a round of applause. [applause] glnchtsz more from the conference now from the mayor rudy guiliani
, , because i might not be able to take care of you," that is important to a senior citizen. on education, people need to really dig and find out what the educational programs are all about. it is more money and more money. it is all for the unions. if there were things going on in the school that the parents could see, instead of being pushed aside because the government wants to take over the children, and not let the parents have anything to say -- there are other subjects as well as the middle-class. host: will give you a chance to respond to some of her comments. guest: i think she is right. all the voters should have an opportunity to look behind the ads and build into the research on the individual candidates. they should come out knowing this country needs a change in direction, and who will create the number of jobs that are necessary. i think governor mitt romney has that program, if you look at it in depth. his commitment to produce 12 million jobs over the next four years, the way this country has to do. also, to take regulation out of the small business community, so that our
the creator of star wars is giving "new hope" to education. first business starts now. you're watching first business: financial news, analysis, and today's investment ideas. good morning everybody. i'm angela miles. it's november 2nd, and it's jobs friday. it may or may not be deal-breaker for voters, but tensions are high over the jobs numbers due out today. it's anticipated 125,000 jobs were added in october, and the unemployment rate edged up to 7.9% from 7.8%. in the latest numbers on jobs, adp reports 158,000 jobs were added to payrolls last month, while the goverment reports claims for unemployment benefits last week fell by 9,000 to 363,000. stocks surged ahead of today's jobs numbers. the dow rallied 137 points, the nasdaq up 43, and the s&p popped 16 pts. gold dropped $4 and oil inched up to nearly $87. tim mulholland of china america capital joins us now from the trading floor of cme group. good morning, good to have you on the show this morning on this jobs friday. > > good to be here. > > what do you anticipate as far as the numbers? > > looking at the adp report wednesday and
, the facility offers three master's degree programs using german educational standards. >> in the egyptian desert directly next to the resort is where you'll find the egyptian satellite campus of the technical university of berlin. the campus cost 40 million euros to build. it is the brainchild of an egyptian multimillion there. the result is the 10,000 square meter campus. students enrolled in energy engineering, urban development, and water engineering. as to the body consists of 27 men and three women from india, china, south africa and egypt. >> i want a program that is more or less a mix of here and abroad. i did not want to do two consecutive years in germany, and i'm afraid i will never come back to egypt. >> the university wants students to go home when they graduate and contribute to their country's development. this didn't come from johannesburg to study water and engineering. she will be spending her second semester in berlin. >> i am looking forward to it. hopefully i come back in october. that should be really cool. i look forward to meeting new people in berlin in making new
-elected he's going to say every good thing you can think of about education but in the final analysis heel do what his biggest supporters, the public sector unions insist upon and your kids will be in the same schools with the same results. when i'm president i'm going to be a voice of the children and the parents. there's no union for the p.t.a. [applause] i'm going to make sure parents have the information they need to know if their school is succeeding or failing and i want them to have the choice they can pick the school where their child can succeed. [applause] i've watched over these last few months as our campaign has gathered the strength of a movement, not only size of crowds like this, it's the depth of our shared conviction. our readiness for new possibilities. the sense that our work is soon to begin. it's made me strive more to be worthy of your support, to campaign as i would govern. to speak for the aspirations of all americans. i learned the best achievements are shared apreevementcheevements. i learned respect go along way and are returned in kind. that's how i'll conduct mys
any democratic president has done. that's a pretty big deal. and i think education reform with the grants are also really important. so he has done stuff but what is interesting to me, and i don't fully understand is, why not campaign on that? >> eliot: robert has made a point. chrystia you're right. in terms of wealth, income and. >> healthcare was a distraction because he followed hillary clinton's advice. he didn't have a single payer. he didn't have any robust public option. he did nothing to control costs nothing. >> but isn't it better than nothing? >> look, if i lived in a swing state i would vote for obama no doubt about it. romney scares me. he wants to give wall street a bank check. he is a greater evil. >> eliot: you were clear you said he's the lesser of two evils. >> obama. >> eliot: yes. you did not describe him in the affirmative vote. >> you know this better than i do. when you put lawrence sumners in and timothy geithner, you are clear about it. i would have voted for you. that's why i came on this show. seriously, you had the right mentionmessage. i'm not
think we can do some pretty radical things in education and training. you know, i don't see why education should be -- should cost -- why higher education should cost any american more than a nominal amount. i think that we can give tuition-free scholarships to everyone who attends public schools, public universities. and we have great public universities in america. and it would be a matter of rechanneling the student aid we now provide into this. and it would take it away from the private universities. i am saying look i'm a product of private universities but as a matter of public policy the distribution of money between the private and public sector in education i think is a matter of indifference. what matters is people's access to college education and tuition should not be a barrier. i also think that we could and we've been proposing this in various forms for 15 years, since the mid 90s -- that's 15 years -- use the community college system as a means of providing any american free access to it skills. open up the computer labs, staff them. anybody who walks in can get t
academy to take care of her grieving mother father during months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond, georgia and surrounding areas welcomed matthew home with tears, flags and salutes. the streets are lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing at his memorial service as a method in church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout and a local boy scout by collecting pens and paper and sent them to matthew's unit in afghanistan. a dear friend, jim bunn who is involved in media had a vision and the matthew freeman project again. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film that launched the project on memorial day 2010. since then, with the help of so many volunteers, he can't name them all, the project has spent over seven tons of school supplies to soldiers are buried for humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthew small town of richmond hill, now a city of savanna and our great army bases at fort stewart and hunter army airfield in savanna air guard to help me heal by supporting the matthew
program, clear-cut ways to improve education. >> joe, i remember a couple of years ago -- >> i do it every year. >> but a series of wonderful articles, before the midterm for "time" magazine. you talked over a lot of the midwest, middle class. and you found that the -- china came up ten times as often as afghanistan -- >> 20. >> 20 types as often as afghanistan. when you look at the -- what an average middle-class american family is facing, particularly kind of people who work in factories, they're up against probably a generation of this kind of wage competition and -- possibly wage deflation because of china, things. do you -- what do you think happens to the politics of america if that middle class is not appreciably better five, six, eight years from now? >> well, we're heading toward, i think, a demographic period of real difficulty as the white majority declines. and there's -- and there's a fear of -- out in the middle of the country of this new america that's emerging that is so multicultural, multiethnic. but i do think -- once again, i'm going to be slightly optimistic here becau
and pet neighborhood and their initiative, be it education and farming. everyone was dependent upon detroit. other people you know, feel that it's their responsibility, and foundation to assist the people and poverty. it's a very low performing school system. there's a high rate of illiteracy. there's something for every foundation in detroit. just recently, actually, you mentioned federal funding, 164 firefighters were laid off as part of this downsizing, as part of this effort for mayor bling to get the finances under control in the city. firefighters, which detroit needs because it's got sort of the highest case of arson in the country. these guys are laid off. about two weeks later, miraculously a hundred guys are rehired. when you look to find out where the money came from, it's actually department of homeland security has the funds for things like that. i don't want to overstate, that's something you want to think about. the department of homeland security needed to step in to keep detroit as safe as it can be for the moment. we're talking about -- i wonder, we seen the auto
you some money. my job is not just to entertain you, fwou educate -- but to educate you, so call me. china. china. the people's republic is more important than we are. that's my conclusion after today's session where the averages rocked a bit higher. the dow gaining 136 points. the nasdaq growing 1.44%. i never want to sell the united states short, ever. hurricane sandy could impact the entire nation as federal money and private insurance starts paying off and construction comes back with a vengeance. auto and home industries are coming back with more confidence than ever. and there is real hope in the air that tomorrow's big employment report might show some nice gains. the jobs report were a tad better than expects. that said, the upward move we saw in many stocks today, particularly in the industrials cannot be traced to anything happening here. no, not at all. these gains were all about one piece of data out of china. and not anything else you heard about why the stocks moved is wrong. we got the boost of stocks from fedex and the freight transporter into a mining and equipment
has to appeal to the swing areas. more independent voters. and you had this educated, affluent group, the base around ohio state university. and that has been critical. in the end, if you show that map, ohio is broken up, we have said it for years into 5 ohios. those five areas, plus some of the border areas, we have about seven media markets. it makes a very expensive to campaign here. in gubernatorial races and some presidential races there will go to west virginia to reach the southern ohio parts. that is where the bigger market is and that has to be part of the mix, too. ohio is five ohios. host: we talked about the issues, the top issues in ohio in this election cycle -- can we talk about the issues? guest: this is like to been a shock to your viewers, but the auto issue has been huge here. i have never seen where one issue in the campaign can play so well here. obviously, it is the battle of the bailout. who wanted to take it into bankruptcy. who got hurt, who did not. you are seeing the new ones being played on. and you are seeing the big swing, which is on the president's sid
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